Top 90s Greatest Party Songs In 2018 | The Top of the Pops: The 90’s

Top 90s Greatest Party Songs In 2018 | The Top of the Pops: The 90’s

The ‘90s was an awesome decade filled with some of the best Robin Williams movies, sketchy Tv Shows and of course, prime music- from Britney spears teen pop, to Biggie Smalls legendary rap. Although it is close to 20 years in the past, one of the best things about 90’s music is that it only takes ONE hit to come on- and everyone is jamming out on the dance floor just like old times! Oh the power of nostalgia.

That explains why ‘90s music is so in-demand these days! Whether it’s your high school reunion, your wedding program, a road trip, or just something to jam out to in the shower, you can never go wrong with a 90’s hit! Although, it may have been a good two decades since that glorious era, the master pieces produced still live on to this day!

Whether you’re a DJ in Melbourne or just hosting your own get-together with friends and/or family, you will be an expert of creating the perfect 90’s playlist that will take you back to the days of beepers and GSM phones. Only after reading this article, of course!

On a side note though, this article isn’t necessarily about identifying the most popular ‘90s hits. It’s a starter pack for you or your DJ to compile the perfect playlist for your birthday celebration, a corporate event, or any type of party in 2018. Our goal is to keep your guests on their feet in with these ‘90s dance hits.

As an added nugget for those who want to know the origins of these musical trends in the ‘90s, we also put together some insights and tidbits about the history of the music that came out during this period.

Whether you’re a DJ here in Melbourne, or someone who’s just playing music off Spotify, you’ll be an expert of 90’s music in no time!

What The ‘90s Looked Like!

Oh the days of Crop tops, denim jeans, leather jackets and butterfly clips… ahh 90’s fashion! The fashion trend that really had no end- patterns, sheers, hats and much more! Its diversity is why everyone loves it so much! Who can forget  the most iconic outfits from the Spice girls and Clueless’ Cher- still making an appearance at EVERY dress up party to this day. And for those young ones, who still havent had a glimpse of 90’s fashion, you remember Bruno Mars and Cardi B’s “Finesse” performance live at The Grammys earlier this year? That’s the popular fashion that was worn during the 90’s!

Movies like Jerry Maguire and Titanic had women all over the world swooning at the likes of Tom Cruise and Leonardo DiCaprio. Meanwhile, this decade also had inventions that changed the world in the MP3 player, the Sony PlayStation, and of course, the Internet. You could say the ‘90s were a gateway into the modern world as we know it today!

What the 90s’ Sounded Like?

In terms of music, you could say that ‘90s pop was an extension of the teen pop and dance-pop trends that emerged in the ‘70s and ‘80s. This crystallised into a genre of its own called bubblegum pop, a sub-genre characterised by upbeat music primarily targeted towards pre-teens and teenagers.

Boybands are a staple of bubblegum pop. But here’s a fun fact: boybands have been around since the 1960s (Eg. The Osmonds), the 1970s—you could make a case for The Jackson 5—and the 1980s (Menudo, New Kids On The Block)! But boybands truly owned the ‘90s, thanks to groups like the Backstreet Boys, *NSYNC, Take That, 98 Degrees, LFO (or Lyte Funky Ones) and Australia’s own Human Nature.

Their female counterparts also emerged in girl bands (or girl groups, depending on how you’d like to call them). Initially, girl groups gravitated towards genres like R&B, new jack swing, and even hip-hop. In the U.S., groups like TLC, En Vogue, Exposé, and SWV all achieved various levels of popularity and commercial success. This laid the groundwork for Destiny’s Child, which would be the platform for Beyoncé’s eventual launch into superstardom.

However, while the American girl group scene was dominated by R&B acts, British acts began dominating the genre with the Spice Girls leading the way and eventually selling the most records for a British group since The Beatles. Meanwhile, their success carried over to other British girl groups like All Saints, Atomic Kitten, Eternal, and Ireland’s B*Witched, who all peaked to different degrees on the charts.

Today, boybands and girl groups still exist, with One Direction being the most recent example of a successful boyband from the current decade. Girl groups haven’t achieved the same heights of success, especially in the U.S., with Fifth Harmony—which has since disbanded—being the exception. In the U.K., acts like Little Mix and The Saturdays broke into the mainstream but not to the same heights of Fifth Harmony.

But the real hub of boybands and girl groups is in Asia, particularly Japan and South Korea, two countries whose entertainment industry has made an entire business out of creating and marketing these groups alone. From Japan’s AKB48 to Korean groups like Girls Generation, 2NE1, BTS, and EXO, you can see how the dance-pop era never actually died in the ‘90s. It’s taken on a completely different life on its own in East Asia.

Zooming out, in terms of the mainstream music scene, the three most popular genres were pop, rap, and alternative rock. But it wasn’t just the pop and dance scene that grew in the ‘90s. Hip-hop also experienced a growth in popularity and influence during this time.

Daft Punk
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‘90s Hip-Hop… The Golden Age?

The golden age of hip-hop is generally considered to be between the mid-’80s to the early ‘90s. The previous decade saw the rise of hip-hop as a genre, so it only made sense that it rose from that foundation afterwards. Artists were pretty experimental with their sound and used techniques like sampling from old records. The innovation, quality, and diversity reflected in their music.

A lot of artists from this point in hip-hop came from the metropolitan area of New York. But if you want to name acts that really made it big during this time, you have the likes of LL Cool J, Slick Rick, Public Enemy, Run-D.M.C., the Beastie Boys, De La Soul, and A Tribe Called Quest.

Gangsta rap also emerged during this time, which coincided with the rise of acts like Ice-T and Compton-based supergroup N.W.A., which gave birth to the stars Ice Cube, Dr Dre, and the late Eazy-E.

Party-oriented hip-hop was also a thing during this time, as evidenced by the popularity of MC Hammer, DJ Jazzy Jeff & The Fresh Prince, the latter of which would go on to more mainstream fame under his real name, Will Smith.

Midway through the ‘90s, hip-hop went through a revolution of its own and achieved critical and commercial success. Much of this was due to the rivalry between the East Coast and the West Coast, which may have divided both fans and the scene itself, but added to the overall notoriety of the industry. The faces of that rivalry were undoubtedly The Notorious B.I.G., who represented the East and Tupac Shakur, who represented the West.

By the late ‘90s, the East Coast/West Coast rivalry began to fade, which coincided with rappers from other parts of the U.S. emerged. Atlanta became a hotbed for rising stars like Outkast (André 3000 and Big Boi), Lil Jon, and Ludacris. The Midwest also got represented by Detroit’s Eminem, who would release his debut single in 1998, kickstarting a career that would defy all sorts of conventions and expectations over the years.

‘90s Commercial Pop & Dance

If you know your ‘90s music, you’d know that a huge chunk of what remains popular today is its dance music. Evolving from the disco era of the ‘70s and ‘80s, ‘90s dance music gave rise to different subgenres such as house, trance, and techno—all of which are still very much alive in 2018!

Some of the most well-known top 90s dance music from that era include hits like “Pump Up The Jam” by Technotronic, which technically came out in 1989, but had its popularity bleed into the next decade. Other club bangers from that time include Dr Alban’s “Sing Hallelujah” from 1992, which filled up countless dance floors.

Towards the end of the ‘90s, The Vengaboys, a Eurodance group based in Rotterdam, released the earworm “We Like To Party! (The Vengabus)” in 1999, giving many kids, teens, and young adults a serious case of Last Song Syndrome (or LSS) in the process.

Dance music is very much a part of the pop scene today through the rise of EDM or electronic dance music. As a genre, it had always been out of the mainstream eye until the last decade, thanks to the emergence of producers like David Guetta, Calvin Harris, and Zedd.

But they wouldn’t have achieved the success they have without the earlier underground tracks that introduced the genre into pop culture. In fact, these songs have achieved such an impact that they are still played at events today, cementing the ‘90s as the golden years of house music.

Songs like “King Of My Castle” by Wamdue Project, “You Don’t Know Me” by Armand Van Helden, or Stardust’s “Music Sounds Better With You” remain as staples at ‘90s-themed events or radio shows. Before songs like “Closer” by The Chainsmokers or “Clarity” by Zedd were all the rage, before drops became the new hooks, and before producers became superstars in their own right, these commercial 90s dancefloor hits lorded over the clubs.

All of this is a testament to that their influence, which is absolutely recognised and even revered.

90s album covers

The Best 1990s Songs in 2018

If you’re looking for the best list of 1990’s songs, you’ve found it!

This list of ‘90s favourites will surely have your party guests on the dancefloor as they reminisce about the good old days at school or at the club! Wherever in the world you are, this playlist is sure to be a hit.

You may be asking yourself, “How sure are you that this will take off?” Well, we have been in the Melbourne DJ Hire scene for years now. This playlist isn’t just a bunch of ‘90s songs that we like. They’ve been regularly selected and requested at parties week in and week out!

In no particular order, here are some of the top 90s dance music picks from parties from birthday celebrators aged 18-90!

Top 90s Dance & Party Hits 

(In No Particular Order)

  1. “Don’t Stop Moving” – S Club
  2. “Get Ready For This” – 2 Unlimited
  3. “Keep On Movin” – Five
  4. “Finally” – Ce Ce Peniston
  5. “Wannabe” – Spice Girls
  6. “Pretty Fly For A White Guy” – The Offspring
  7. “Cotton Eyed Joe” – StarSound
  8. “Hit Me Baby One More Time” – Britney Spears
  9. “Sing Hallelujah” – Dr. Alban
  10. “The Sign” – Ace of the Base
  11. “All That She Wants” – Ace of the Base
  12. “Smooth Criminal” – Michael Jackson
  13. “Gonna Make You Sweat” (Everybody Dance Now)-  Music Factory
  14. “Everybody” – Backstreet Boys
  15. “Keep On Moving”- Five
  16. “Murder on the Dancefloor” – Sophie Ellis-Bextor  
  17. “Lets Get Loud”- Jennifer Lopez
  18. “Good Vibrations” – Marky Mark and the Funky Bunch
  19. “Sing It Back” – Moloko
  20. “Canned Heart” – Jamiroquai
  21. “Don’t Stop” – ATB
  22. “Another Night” – Real Mccoy
  23. “Mr Vain” –  Culture Beat
  24. “The Key, The Secret” –   Urban Cookie Collective
  25. “Rhythm is a Dancer” – Snap!
  26. “Zombie Nation” –  Kernkraft 400
  27. “We Like To Party” – The Vengaboys
  28. “Mambo No. 5” –  Lou Bega
  29. “I Like To Move It”-  Reel 2 Real feat. The Mad Stuntman
  30. “Baby One More TIme”  – Britney Spears
  31. “I Like To Move It” Reel 2 Real feat. The Mad Stuntman
  32. “What Is Love” – Haddaway
  33. “Rhythm Is a Dancer” – SNAP
  34. “Better Off Alone” – Alice Deejay
  35. “Sandstorm” – Darude
  36. “Groove Is In The Heart” – Dee-Lite
  37. “Be My Lover” – La Bouche
  38. “Blue” – Eiffel 65
  39. “Around The World” – Daft Punk
  40. “Barbie Girl” – Aqua
  41. “Believe” C- Cher
  42. “The Rhythm Of The Night” – Corona
  43. “Livin la Vida Loca” – Ricky Martin
  44. “Insomnia” – Faithless
  45. “Macarena” – Los Del Rio
  46. “Coco Jambo” – Mr. President
  47. “100% Pure Love” – Crystal Waters
  48. “We Like To Party!” – Vengaboys
  49. “Steps” – 5, 6, 7, 8
  50. “If Ya Gettin’ Down” Five

Top 90s Rnb & Hip – Hop Hits

(In No Particular Order)

  1. “California Love” – 2Pac feat. Dr Dre
  2. “Ghetto Superstar” – Pras feat. Mya and Ol’ Dirty Bastard
  3. “Jumpin’ Jumpin’” – Destiny’s Child
  4. “Return of the Mack” – Mark Morrison
  5. “Too Close” – Next
  6. “Gangsta’s Paradise” – Coolio
  7. “Hey Mr DJ” – Zhane
  8. “Shoop” – Salt-N-Pepa
  9. “Let’s Get Married” – Jagged Edge
  10. “Say My Name” – Destiny’s Child
  11. “Party Up In Here” DMX
  12. “Gettin’ Jiggy With It” – Will Smith
  13. “Ice Ice Baby” – Vanilla Ice
  14. “Waterfalls”- TLC
  15. “Mo Money Mo Problems” Biggie Smalls
  16. “She’s Got That Vibe”  R.Kelly
  17. “Cant Touch This” MC Hammer
  18. “Creep” – TLC
  19. “Fantasy” – Mariah Carey
  20. “Pony” – Ginuwine
  21. “Only You (Bad Boy Remix)” –  112 f/ The Notorious B.I.G. & Mase
  22. “This Is How We Do It” – Montell Jordan
  23. “No Diggity” – Blackstreet
  24. “You Make Me Wanna” – Usher
  25. “My Boo” – Ghost Town DJs
  26. “Jump Around” – House of Pain
  27. “Are You That Somebody?” – Aaliyah
  28. “No Scrubs” – TLC
  29. “No Ordinary Love” – Sade
  30. “Bump n Grind” – R. Kelly
  31. “Hypnotize” – The Notorious B.I.G
  32. “Say My Name” Destiny Child
  33. “It’s Tricky” – Run DMC
  34. “Juicy” –  The Notorious B.I.G
  35. “Regulate” – Warren G
  36. Michael Jackson “Remember The Time”
  37. Mr Vain – culture beat
  38. “Mr Boombastic” – Shaggy
  39. “Here Comes the Hotstepper” – Ini Kamoze –
  40. “1,2,3,4” (Sumpin’ New) – Coolio
  41. “Lady Marmalade” – Christina Aguilera
  42. “The Rockafeller Skank” – Fat Boy Slim
  43. “Nuthin’ But A G Thang” – Dr. Dre ft. Snoop Dogg
  44. “My Name Is” – Eminem
  45. “Let’s Talk About Sex”- Salt-N-Pepa
  46. “I’m So Into You” SWV
  47. “I Like the Way(The Kissing Game)” – Hi-Five
  48. “Dont walk away”- Jade
  49. “Bills, Bills, Bills”- Desinty’s Child
  50. “Let’s Ride” – Montell Jordan


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